Who needs translators, we’re in the 21st century… (100happydays – Day 3)

I love technology.

There is a new prototype, an ear piece that translates as someone speaks, I think that’s a really cool invention.

As a person, I am fascinated with other languages, sadly I do not have time to practice and learn as much as I would like to and this invention has its pros and cons.

The biggest con is that people will no longer find the need to learn new languages. It is worth mentioning that when you learn a language it’s not just the words that you learn to speak and understand but also you learn about the people who speak it, consequently the culture the language represents. It would be a shame to miss out on all that rich knowledge because of this invention.

On the flip side, this invention would open more opportunities and in some ways make the world a smaller place, we will truly become one race because we will no longer have the barrier of not understanding each other, literally. Imagine all the places that we can now travel to without hesitation. I’d feel slightly shy to go to a foreign place if I knew people didn’t speak English well enough to understand what I am trying to say.

I’m curious to see how this pans out. Ironically this motivates me to actually learn more languages, I’d love to speak many languages and not just understand what is being said. 🙂

Selectively Curious©

Author: Selectively Curious

Stuck in a limbo, dancing between Abu Dhabi, Dubai and London

5 thoughts on “Who needs translators, we’re in the 21st century… (100happydays – Day 3)”

  1. You should never be held back by a language barrier! You’d be surprised how well you can get along with a smile and some sign language! I’ve been to Japan and India and Egypt and Morocco and Bulgaria and Slovenia and I definitely didn’t speak any language even remotely resembling any of the languages in any of those countries!

    I think learning new languages forces your brain to see things and think in totally different ways depending on the language. You know how a language might have words that other languages don’t have translations for? That means that in one language you’re having a thought that you literally CANNOT have in another language that doesn’t have that word or term. It’s sort of hard to explain but I definitely feel it myself when I switch from Spanish to English or vice versa, it’s a bit like changing gears. I also sometimes have to dip into my Spanish vocabulary for certain things I might be feeling, because I can’t verbalise it in English, or vice versa, and I know that if I was just without one of those two languages I would never know I was missing that…

    I’m not sure that makes sense, but hopefully you can understand it!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. OmG I completely understand and it’s such a coincidence that you would say that. I was reading that there are words in German that describe a specific emotion but there is no such word in English. For example Torschlusspanic in German means panic you feel when time is running out.

      Also I really appreciate the words of encouragement and you’re right, if I want to do something I shouldn’t let something as minor as a foreign language get in the way, it’s all part of the adventure, right? 🙂

      Like

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